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Rehabilitation Research and Practice
Volume 2016, Article ID 8109365, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8109365
Research Article

Physical and Psychosocial Functions of Adults with Lower Limb Congenital Deficiencies and Amputations in Childhood

1Department of Rehabilitation and Traumatology, University Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Passeig de la Vall d’Hebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona, Spain
2Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Passeig de la Vall d’Hebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona, Spain
3Vall d’Hebron Research Institute, Passeig de la Vall d’Hebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona, Spain

Received 26 November 2015; Revised 24 February 2016; Accepted 22 March 2016

Academic Editor: Francois Prince

Copyright © 2016 Ll. Montesinos-Magraner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. (1) To describe the epidemiological and medical features of a sample with LLA and LLD in childhood and (2) to explore their relationship with subsequent physical and psychosocial functions in adulthood. Methods. Cross-sectional survey. Demographics, medical data, Locomotor Capabilities Index (LCI), and Discomfort-Engagement in Everyday Activities Involving Revealing the Body Scale (D-EEARB) were collected from thirty-two adults who suffered from LLA in childhood or LLD. Results. Most of the sample (53.1% males) was working (84.4%), living independently (75%), and single (75%). Mean age was 33.16 (SD = 7.64, range 18–50). Leading causes for LLA were traumatic (40.6%) and oncologic (25%). LLD was present in 6 cases (18.8%). LCI scores revealed a high performance among males (, ). D-EEARB scores showed that 56.25% stated feeling “quite” or “totally comfortable” in situations which involved revealing their body, but 43.75% stated the contrary (“uncomfortable” or “very uncomfortable”). LLD and traumatic LLA show higher scores in D-EEARB than vascular and oncological LLA (, df = 3, ). Conclusions. Adults suffering from LLDs and LLAs during childhood seem to perform well once they are adults. However, 43.75% of patients express considerable discomfort in situations that involve revealing the body.