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Rehabilitation Research and Practice
Volume 2017, Article ID 9569178, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9569178
Research Article

A Mixed Methods Small Pilot Study to Describe the Effects of Upper Limb Training Using a Virtual Reality Gaming System in People with Chronic Stroke

1Department of Health Professions, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester M15 6GX, UK
2The Brain and Spinal Injuries Centre, Eccles Old Road, Salford, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Rachel C. Stockley; ku.ca.umm@yelkcots.r

Received 21 August 2016; Revised 20 December 2016; Accepted 25 December 2016; Published 18 January 2017

Academic Editor: Vincent de Groot

Copyright © 2017 Rachel C. Stockley et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. This small pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of an upper limb rehabilitation system (the YouGrabber) in a community rehabilitation centre, qualitatively explore participant experiences, and describe changes after using it. Methods and Material. Chronic stroke participants attending a community rehabilitation centre in the UK were randomised to either a YouGrabber or a gym group and completed 18 training sessions over 12 weeks. The motor activity log, box and block, and fatigue severity score were administered by a blinded assessor before and after the intervention. Semistructured interviews were used to ascertain participants’ views about using the YouGrabber. Results. Twelve participants (6 females) with chronic stroke were recruited. All adhered to the intervention. There were no adverse events, dropouts, or withdrawal. There were no significant differences between the YouGrabber and gym groups although there were significant within group improvements on the motor activity log (median change: 0.59, range: 0.2–1.25; ) within the YouGrabber group. Participants reported that the YouGrabber was motivational but they expressed frustration with technical challenges. Conclusions. The YouGrabber appeared practical and may improve upper limb activities in people several months after stroke. Future work could examine cognition, cost effectiveness, and different training intensities.