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Rehabilitation Research and Practice
Volume 2018, Article ID 1530245, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1530245
Research Article

Left Right Judgement Task and Sensory, Motor, and Cognitive Assessment in Participants with Wrist/Hand Pain

1Sciences de la Réadaptation, École de Réadaptation, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal (Québec), Canada H3C 3J7
2École de Réadaptation, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal (Québec), Canada H3C 3J7
3Researcher, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal (CRIR), Canada
4Professeur Agrégé Université de Montréal, Chef du Service de Chirurgie Plastique du Centre Hospitalier Université de Montréal (CHUM), 850 rue St-Denis Pav. S-Local S02-128 Montréal (Québec), Canada H2X 0A9
5Service de Chirurgie Plastique, Département de Chirurgie du Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1000 rue Saint-Denis (Québec), Canada H2X 0C1

Correspondence should be addressed to René Pelletier; ac.laertnomu@reitellep.ener

Received 1 June 2018; Revised 20 July 2018; Accepted 2 August 2018; Published 26 August 2018

Academic Editor: Velio Macellari

Copyright © 2018 René Pelletier et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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