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Radiology Research and Practice
Volume 2015, Article ID 752054, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/752054
Research Article

Soft Tissue Masses of Hand: A Radio-Pathological Correlation

1Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India
2Department of Plastic Surgery, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India
3Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India
4Department of Cytopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh 160012, India

Received 4 June 2015; Accepted 28 June 2015

Academic Editor: Andreas H. Mahnken

Copyright © 2015 Aditi Agarwal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Aim. To evaluate soft tissue masses of the hand with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (USG) and to correlate imaging findings with pathological findings. Material and Methods. Thirty-five patients with soft tissue masses of the hand were evaluated with high resolution USG and contrast enhanced MRI of the hand, prospectively over a period of 2.5 years. The radiological diagnosis was then compared with cytology/histopathology. Results. There were a total of 19 (55%) females. The mean age was 27.45 ± 14.7 years. Majority (45%) of cases were heteroechoic. Four cases were predominantly hyperechoic. These were later diagnosed as lipomas. Four cases were anechoic (diagnosed as ganglions). Only four lesions showed hyperintense signal on T1-weighted images. Out of these, 3 were lipomas and one was cavernous haemangioma. Three lesions were hypointense on T2-weighted images. All these lesions were diagnosed as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. A correct diagnosis was possible on MRI in 80% of cases . Conclusion. MRI provides specific findings for diagnosis of certain soft tissue lesions of the hand. Ultrasonography allows accurate diagnosis of hemangioma/vascular malformations. However, in most conditions, imaging findings are nonspecific and diagnosis rests on pathologic evaluation.