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Sarcoma
Volume 2011, Article ID 260757, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/260757
Review Article

The Role of Mirk Kinase in Sarcomas

Department of Pathology, Upstate Medical University, 750 East Adams Street, 2305 Weiskotten Hall, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA

Received 8 September 2010; Accepted 23 February 2011

Academic Editor: H. Kovar

Copyright © 2011 Eileen Friedman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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