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Stem Cells International
Volume 2011, Article ID 429187, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/429187
Research Article

The Role of Glucose, Serum, and Three-Dimensional Cell Culture on the Metabolism of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

1Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, 585 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088, USA
2School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, 585 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088, USA
3Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Purdue University, 585 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088, USA

Received 3 December 2010; Accepted 7 February 2011

Academic Editor: Kenneth R. Boheler

Copyright © 2011 Byron Deorosan and Eric A. Nauman. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have become a critical addition to all facets of tissue engineering. While most in vitro research has focused on their behavior in two-dimensional culture, relatively little is known about the cells' behavior in three-dimensional culture, especially with regard to their metabolic state. To evaluate MSC metabolism during twodimensional culture, murine bone marrow-derived MSCs were cultured for one week using twelve different medium compositions, varying in both glucose and fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations. The results indicate that glucose concentration was the more important factor in sustaining cell growth and viability. To evaluate metabolic state during three-dimensional culture, MSCs were cultured for one week using two different medium compositions and two different concentrations of collagen gel matrix. The medium compositions only varied in glucose concentration. The results indicate that glucose and extracellular matrix were significant factors in the metabolic response of the cells. However, cells cultured in low density collagen exhibited considerable cell death, likely because of physical contraction of the collagen hydrogel which was not observed in the higher density collagen. These findings will be useful to the development of in vitro cell culture models that properly mimic in vivo physiological processes.