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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 367567, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/367567
Review Article

Stem Cell Niche Dynamics: From Homeostasis to Carcinogenesis

1Computational and Systems Biology Interdepartmental Program, School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2Department of Human Genetics, School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, P.O. Box 957059, Suite 2333 PVUB, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7059, USA

Received 7 June 2011; Accepted 23 October 2011

Academic Editor: Linheng Li

Copyright © 2012 Kevin S. Tieu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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