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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012, Article ID 407079, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/407079
Review Article

Extrafollicular Dermal Melanocyte Stem Cells and Melanoma

Department of Biological Sciences, Ferris State University, Big Rapids, MI 49307, USA

Received 17 November 2011; Accepted 13 February 2012

Academic Editor: Stefan Hansson

Copyright © 2012 James D. Hoerter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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