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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012, Article ID 423868, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/423868
Review Article

The Promise of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Dental Research

1Research and Development Department, Hygieia Innovation Sdn. Bhd, Lot 1G-2G, Komplex Lanai, No.2, Persiaran Seri Perdana, Persint 10, Territory of Putrajaya, 62250 Federal, Malaysia
2Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
3Oral Cancer Research and Coordinating Centre (OCRCC), Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
4Department of Oral Pathology, Oral Medicine and Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
5Department of Children's Dentistry and Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 21 November 2011; Revised 20 February 2012; Accepted 22 February 2012

Academic Editor: Rajarshi Pal

Copyright © 2012 Thekkeparambil Chandrabose Srijaya et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem cell-based therapy for treating genetic disorders has become an interesting field of research in recent years. However, there is a paucity of information regarding the applicability of induced pluripotent stem cells in dental research. Recent advances in the use of induced pluripotent stem cells have the potential for developing disease-specific iPSC lines in vitro from patients. Indeed, this has provided a perfect cell source for disease modeling and a better understanding of genetic aberrations, pathogenicity, and drug screening. In this paper, we will summarize the recent progress of the disease-specific iPSC development for various human diseases and try to evaluate the possibility of application of iPS technology in dentistry, including its capacity for reprogramming some genetic orodental diseases. In addition to the easy availability and suitability of dental stem cells, the approach of generating patient-specific pluripotent stem cells will undoubtedly benefit patients suffering from orodental disorders.