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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012, Article ID 454180, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/454180
Review Article

Large Pore Ion and Metabolite-Permeable Channel Regulation of Postnatal Ventricular Zone Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells: Interplay between Aquaporins, Connexins, and Pannexins?

1Division of Medical Sciences, Island Medical Program, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 2Y2
2Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3N5
3Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P6
4Department of Cellular and Physiological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3

Received 5 April 2012; Accepted 27 April 2012

Academic Editor: Stefan Liebau

Copyright © 2012 Leigh E. Wicki-Stordeur and Leigh Anne Swayne. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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