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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012, Article ID 629230, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/629230
Review Article

The Potential of iPS Cells in Synucleinopathy Research

1Institute for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Ulm University, 89081 Ulm, Germany
2Department of Internal Medicine I, Ulm University, 89081 Ulm, Germany

Received 27 October 2011; Accepted 12 January 2012

Academic Editor: Mirella Dottori

Copyright © 2012 Leonhard Linta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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