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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012, Article ID 646725, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/646725
Review Article

Skin-Derived Precursor Cells as an In Vitro Modelling Tool for the Study of Type 1 Neurofibromatosis

1Tissue Engineering Lab, Bioengineering Area, Instituto Biodonostia, Hospital Universitario Donostia, 20014 San Sebastián, Spain
2Department of Dermatology, Hospital Universitario Donostia, 20014 San Sebastián, Spain

Received 14 November 2011; Accepted 18 January 2012

Academic Editor: Mary Familari

Copyright © 2012 Araika Gutiérrez-Rivera et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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