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Stem Cells International
Volume 2012, Article ID 738484, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/738484
Research Article

Development of a Functional Schwann Cell Phenotype from Autologous Porcine Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for Nerve Repair

1Providence Health and Services, 9555 SW Barnes Rd., Portland, OR 97225, USA
2OHSU Center for Regenerative Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239, USA
3Oregon Biomedical Engineering Institute, 25999 SW Canyon Creek Rd., Wilsonville, OR 97070, USA
4Portland VA Medical Center, 3710 SW U.S. Veterans Hospital Rd., Portland, OR 97239, USA

Received 17 February 2012; Accepted 29 March 2012

Academic Editor: J. Gimble

Copyright © 2012 Michael J. Rutten et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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