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Stem Cells International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 353097, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/353097
Review Article

Immunomodulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Revisited in the Context of Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

1Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies, Charité, University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow Clinic, Südstrabe 2, 13353 Berlin, Germany
2Institute of Medical Immunology, Charité, University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow Clinic, Südstrabe 2, 13353 Berlin, Germany
3Department of Cardiology and Pneumology, Charité, University Medicine Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12203 Berlin, Germany
4DZHK, Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislauf-Forschung, Berlin, Germany

Received 18 December 2012; Accepted 13 May 2013

Academic Editor: Bruno Peault

Copyright © 2013 Kapka Miteva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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