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Stem Cells International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 125683, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/125683
Research Article

Fibroblast Growth Factor 18 Increases the Trophic Effects of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Chondrocytes Isolated from Late Stage Osteoarthritic Patients

1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 23 You Zheng Street, Nangang District, Harbin 150001, China
2Microscopic Hand Surgery, People’s Hospital of Hainan Province, Haikou 570100, China

Received 14 August 2014; Revised 5 November 2014; Accepted 6 November 2014; Published 3 December 2014

Academic Editor: Hung-Fat Tse

Copyright © 2014 Zhenyu Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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