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Stem Cells International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 306573, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/306573
Review Article

Clinical Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Diseases

Laboratorio di Cellule Staminali, Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Medico-Chirurgica e dei Trapianti, Università degli Studi di Milano, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Centro Dino Ferrari, Via F. Sforza 35, 20122 Milano, Italy

Received 4 December 2013; Revised 14 April 2014; Accepted 15 April 2014; Published 30 April 2014

Academic Editor: Katherine Athayde Teixeira de Carvalho

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Farini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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