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Stem Cells International
Volume 2014, Article ID 610495, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/610495
Research Article

Migration, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Treated with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid

1Centre for Innovation (Formerly Research & Development), Canadian Blood Services, 8249-112 Street, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2R8
2Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, 8440-112 Street, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2B7

Received 25 June 2013; Revised 30 January 2014; Accepted 4 February 2014; Published 16 March 2014

Academic Editor: Pavla Jendelova

Copyright © 2014 Leah A. Marquez-Curtis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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