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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 182985, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/182985
Review Article

Glioblastoma Circulating Cells: Reality, Trap or Illusion?

1Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, GIGA-Neuroscience, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
2Department of Neurosurgery, CHU and University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
3Department of Neurology, CHU and University of Liège, Liège, Belgium
4GIGA-Development, Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium

Received 3 March 2015; Accepted 19 April 2015

Academic Editor: Yupo Ma

Copyright © 2015 A. Lombard et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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