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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015, Article ID 427518, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/427518
Review Article

EGFR Amplification and Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells

1Laboratory for Brain Tumor Biology, Department of Neurosurgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany
2Laboratory for Tumor Genetics, Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany

Received 15 February 2015; Revised 21 May 2015; Accepted 25 May 2015

Academic Editor: Giorgio Stassi

Copyright © 2015 Katrin Liffers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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