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Stem Cells International
Volume 2015, Article ID 959807, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/959807
Review Article

Organ In Vitro Culture: What Have We Learned about Early Kidney Development?

1Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Biocenter Oulu, Oulu University, 90220 Oulu, Finland
2Renal Regeneration Laboratory, VAGLAHS at Sepulveda, North Hills, CA 91343, USA
3David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 7 November 2014; Revised 7 January 2015; Accepted 8 January 2015

Academic Editor: Laura Lasagni

Copyright © 2015 Aleksandra Rak-Raszewska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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