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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1036974, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1036974
Review Article

Generating Diverse Spinal Motor Neuron Subtypes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

1Department of Molecular Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London WC1N 3BG, UK
2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK
3University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK

Received 1 March 2015; Accepted 14 September 2015

Academic Editor: Joel C. Glover

Copyright © 2016 Rickie Patani. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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