Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1243659, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1243659
Research Article

Secretome of Olfactory Mucosa Mesenchymal Stem Cell, a Multiple Potential Stem Cell

1Key Laboratory of Protein Chemistry and Developmental Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081, China
2Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Hunan Normal University (163 Hospital of PLA), Changsha 410003, China
3Orthopedics Department, Second Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710004, China

Received 8 October 2015; Revised 5 December 2015; Accepted 24 December 2015

Academic Editor: Heinrich Sauer

Copyright © 2016 Lite Ge et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. E. A. Maguire, D. G. Gadian, I. S. Johnsrude et al., “Navigation-related structural change in the hippocampi of taxi drivers,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 97, no. 8, pp. 4398–4403, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. B. E. Reubinoff, P. Itsykson, T. Turetsky et al., “Neural progenitors from human embryonic stem cells,” Nature Biotechnology, vol. 19, no. 12, pp. 1134–1140, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. Y. Yu, J. He, Y. Zhang et al., “Increased hippocampal neurogenesis in the progressive stage of Alzheimer's disease phenotype in an APP/PS1 double transgenic mouse model,” Hippocampus, vol. 19, no. 12, pp. 1247–1253, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. K. Jin, A. L. Peel, X. O. Mao et al., “Increased hippocampal neurogenesis in Alzheimer's disease,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 101, no. 1, pp. 343–347, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  5. B. Li, H. Yamamori, Y. Tatebayashi et al., “Failure of neuronal maturation in Alzheimer disease dentate gyrus,” Journal of Neuropathology & Experimental Neurology, vol. 67, no. 1, pp. 78–84, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. O. Lindvall and Z. Kokaia, “Stem cells for the treatment of neurological disorders,” Nature, vol. 441, no. 7097, pp. 1094–1096, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. S. Aggarwal and M. F. Pittenger, “Human mesenchymal stem cells modulate allogeneic immune cell responses,” Blood, vol. 105, no. 4, pp. 1815–1822, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. T. Hayashi, S. Wakao, M. Kitada et al., “Autologous mesenchymal stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons function in parkinsonian macaques,” The Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 123, no. 1, pp. 272–284, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. F. P. Barry and J. M. Murphy, “Mesenchymal stem cells: clinical applications and biological characterization,” The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 568–584, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. T. A. S. Amos and M. Y. Gordon, “Sources of human hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation—a review,” Cell Transplantation, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 547–569, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. S. M. Mueller and J. Glowacki, “Age-related decline in the osteogenic potential of human bone marrow cells cultured in three-dimensional collagen sponges,” Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, vol. 82, no. 4, pp. 583–590, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. K. Stenderup, J. Justesen, C. Clausen, and M. Kassem, “Aging is associated with decreased maximal life span and accelerated senescence of bone marrow stromal cells,” Bone, vol. 33, no. 6, pp. 919–926, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. W. Murrell, F. Féron, A. Wetzig et al., “Multipotent stem cells from adult olfactory mucosa,” Developmental Dynamics, vol. 233, no. 2, pp. 496–515, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. B. Delorme, E. Nivet, J. Gaillard et al., “The human nose harbors a niche of olfactory ectomesenchymal stem cells displaying neurogenic and osteogenic properties,” Stem Cells and Development, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 853–866, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. N. Boone, A. Bergon, B. Loriod et al., “Genome-wide analysis of familial dysautonomia and kinetin target genes with patient olfactory ecto-mesenchymal stem cells,” Human Mutation, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 530–540, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. Z. Guo, K. Draheim, and S. Lyle, “Isolation and culture of adult epithelial stem cells from human skin,” Journal of Visualized Experiments, no. 49, article 2561, 2011. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. C. McDonald, A. Mackay-Sim, D. Crane, and W. Murrell, “Could cells from your nose fix your heart? Transplantation of olfactory stem cells in a rat model of cardiac infarction,” TheScientificWorldJOURNAL, vol. 10, pp. 422–433, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. Toft, M. Tomé, S. L. Lindsay, S. C. Barnett, and J. S. Riddell, “Transplant-mediated repair properties of rat olfactory mucosal OM-I and OM-II sphere-forming cells,” Journal of Neuroscience Research, vol. 90, no. 3, pp. 619–631, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. M. Xiao, K. M. Klueber, J. Zhou et al., “Human adult olfactory neural progenitors promote axotomized rubrospinal tract axonal reinnervation and locomotor recovery,” Neurobiology of Disease, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 363–374, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. M. Xiao, K. M. Klueber, C. Lu et al., “Human adult olfactory neural progenitors rescue axotomized rodent rubrospinal neurons and promote functional recovery,” Experimental Neurology, vol. 194, no. 1, pp. 12–30, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. E. Nivet, M. Vignes, S. D. Girard et al., “Engraftment of human nasal olfactory stem cells restores neuroplasticity in mice with hippocampal lesions,” The Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 121, no. 7, pp. 2808–2820, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. W. Murrell, A. Wetzig, M. Donnellan et al., “Olfactory mucosa is a potential source for autologous stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease,” STEM CELLS, vol. 26, no. 8, pp. 2183–2192, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. S. R. Pandit, J. M. Sullivan, V. Egger, A. A. Borecki, and S. Oleskevich, “Functional effects of adult human olfactory stem cells on early-onset sensorineural hearing loss,” STEM CELLS, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 670–677, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. E. Bas, T. R. Van De Water, V. Lumbreras et al., “Adult human nasal mesenchymal-like stem cells restore cochlear spiral ganglion neurons after experimental lesion,” Stem Cells and Development, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 502–514, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. A. I. Caplan and J. E. Dennis, “Mesenchymal stem cells as trophic mediators,” Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, vol. 98, no. 5, pp. 1076–1084, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. M. Makridakis, M. G. Roubelakis, and A. Vlahou, “Stem cells: insights into the secretome,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)—Proteins and Proteomics, vol. 1834, no. 11, pp. 2380–2384, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. A. J. B. O. G. Salgado, R. L. G. Reis, N. J. C. Sousa, and J. M. Gimble, “Adipose tissue derived stem cells secretome: soluble factors and their roles in regenerative medicine,” Current Stem Cell Research & Therapy, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 103–110, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. S. H. Hwang, S. H. Park, J. Choi et al., “Age-related characteristics of multipotent human nasal inferior turbinate-derived mesenchymal stem cells,” PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 9, Article ID e74330, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. F. Scintu, C. Reali, R. Pillai et al., “Differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells into cells with a neural phenotype: diverse effects of two specific treatments,” BMC Neuroscience, vol. 7, article 14, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. M. J. Lee, J. Kim, M. Y. Kim et al., “Proteomic analysis of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced secretome of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells,” Journal of Proteome Research, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 1754–1762, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. J. A. Dowell, J. A. Johnson, and L. Li, “Identification of astrocyte secreted proteins with a combination of shotgun proteomics and bioinformatics,” Journal of Proteome Research, vol. 8, no. 8, pp. 4135–4143, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. R.-Z. Lin, R. Moreno-Luna, D. Li, S.-C. Jaminet, A. K. Greene, and J. M. Melero-Martin, “Human endothelial colony-forming cells serve as trophic mediators for mesenchymal stem cell engraftment via paracrine signaling,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 111, no. 28, pp. 10137–10142, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. C.-H. Liu and S.-M. Hwang, “Cytokine interactions in mesenchymal stem cells from cord blood,” Cytokine, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 270–279, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. H. M. Kwon, S.-M. Hur, K.-Y. Park et al., “Multiple paracrine factors secreted by mesenchymal stem cells contribute to angiogenesis,” Vascular Pharmacology, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 19–28, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. L. Xing, R. Cui, L. Peng et al., “Mesenchymal stem cells, not conditioned medium, contribute to kidney repair after ischemia-reperfusion injury,” Stem Cell Research & Therapy, vol. 5, no. 4, article 101, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. C.-K. Huang, S. K. Lee, J. Luo, R. H. Wang, Q. Dang, and C. Chang, “A mouse model of liver injury to evaluate paracrine and endocrine effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells,” in Animal Models for Stem Cell Therapy, vol. 1213 of Methods in Molecular Biology, pp. 69–79, Springer, New York, NY, USA, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  37. H.-D. Guo, G.-H. Cui, J.-X. Tian et al., “Transplantation of salvianolic acid B pretreated mesenchymal stem cells improves cardiac function in rats with myocardial infarction through angiogenesis and paracrine mechanisms,” International Journal of Cardiology, vol. 177, no. 2, pp. 538–542, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. K. Menezes, M. A. Nascimento, J. P. Gonçalves et al., “Human mesenchymal cells from adipose tissue deposit laminin and promote regeneration of injured spinal cord in rats,” PLoS ONE, vol. 9, no. 5, Article ID e96020, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. S. K. Sze, D. P. V. de Kleijn, R. C. Lai et al., “Elucidating the secretion proteome of human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells,” Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, vol. 6, no. 10, pp. 1680–1689, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. D. Chesik, N. M. Kühl, N. Wilczak, and J. De Keyser, “Enhanced production and proteolytic degradation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 in proliferating rat astrocytes,” Journal of Neuroscience Research, vol. 77, no. 3, pp. 354–362, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. N. D. Åberg, K. G. Brywe, and J. Isgaard, “Aspects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I related to neuroprotection, regeneration, and functional plasticity in the adult brain,” TheScientificWorldJOURNAL, vol. 6, pp. 53–80, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. J. I. Jones and D. R. Clemmons, “Insulin-like growth factors and their binding proteins: biological actions,” Endocrine Reviews, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 3–34, 1995. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. T. Fukushima and H. Kataoka, “Roles of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) in glioblastoma,” Anticancer Research, vol. 27, no. 6, pp. 3685–3692, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. V. C. Russo, L. A. Bach, A. J. Fosang, N. L. Baker, and G. A. Werther, “Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 binds to cell surface proteoglycans in the rat brain olfactory bulb,” Endocrinology, vol. 138, no. 11, pp. 4858–4867, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. K. M. Wright, K. A. Lyon, H. Leung, D. J. Leahy, L. Ma, and D. D. Ginty, “Dystroglycan organizes axon guidance cue localization and axonal pathfinding,” Neuron, vol. 76, no. 5, pp. 931–944, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. R. Frischknecht, K.-J. Chang, M. N. Rasband, and C. I. Seidenbecher, “Neural ECM molecules in axonal and synaptic homeostatic plasticity,” Progress in Brain Research, vol. 214, pp. 81–100, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. A. Sgambato, A. Camerini, D. Amoroso et al., “Expression of dystroglycan correlates with tumor grade and predicts survival in renal cell carcinoma,” Cancer Biology and Therapy, vol. 6, no. 12, pp. 1840–1846, 2007. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. A. Sgambato, A. Camerini, G. Genovese et al., “Loss of nuclear p27kip1 and α-dystroglycan is a frequent event and is a strong predictor of poor outcome in renal cell carcinoma,” Cancer Science, vol. 101, no. 9, pp. 2080–2086, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. J. G. Shen, C. Y. Xu, X. Li et al., “Dystroglycan is associated with tumor progression and patient survival in gastric cancer,” Pathology and Oncology Research, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 79–84, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. D. Porter, S. Weremowicz, K. Chin et al., “A neural survival factor is a candidate oncogene in breast cancer,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 100, no. 19, pp. 10931–10936, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. P. Carmona-Mora and K. Walz, “Retinoic acid induced 1, RAI1: a dosage sensitive gene related to neurobehavioral alterations including autistic behavior,” Current Genomics, vol. 11, no. 8, pp. 607–617, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. R. Tahir, A. Kennedy, S. H. Elsea, and A. J. Dickinson, “Retinoic acid induced-1 (Rai1) regulates craniofacial and brain development in Xenopus,” Mechanisms of Development, vol. 133, pp. 91–104, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. S. D. Patel, C. P. Chen, F. Bahna, B. Honig, and L. Shapiro, “Cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion: sticking together as a family,” Current Opinion in Structural Biology, vol. 13, no. 6, pp. 690–698, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. W. J. Rettig, P. Garin-Chesa, J. H. Healey, S. L. Su, E. A. Jaffe, and L. J. Old, “Identification of endosialin, a cell surface glycoprotein of vascular endothelial cells in human cancer,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 89, no. 22, pp. 10832–10836, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. B. St Croix, C. Rago, V. Velculescu et al., “Genes expressed in human tumor endothelium,” Science, vol. 289, no. 5482, pp. 1197–1202, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. S. Seaman, J. Stevens, M. Y. Yang, D. Logsdon, C. Graff-Cherry, and B. St Croix, “Genes that distinguish physiological and pathological angiogenesis,” Cancer Cell, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 539–554, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  57. G. Davies, G. H. Cunnick, R. E. Mansel, M. D. Mason, and W. G. Jiang, “Levels of expression of endothelial markers specific to tumour-associated endothelial cells and their correlation with prognosis in patients with breast cancer,” Clinical & Experimental Metastasis, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 31–37, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  58. S. L. Madden, B. P. Cook, M. Nacht et al., “Vascular gene expression in nonneoplastic and malignant brain,” The American Journal of Pathology, vol. 165, no. 2, pp. 601–608, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  59. J. Brady, J. Neal, N. Sadakar, and P. Gasque, “Human endosialin (tumor endothelial marker 1) is abundantly expressed in highly malignant and invasive brain tumors,” Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, vol. 63, no. 12, pp. 1274–1283, 2004. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  60. E. B. Carson-Walter, D. N. Watkins, A. Nanda, B. Vogelstein, K. W. Kinzler, and B. St Croix, “Cell surface tumor endothelial markers are conserved in mice and humans,” Cancer Research, vol. 61, no. 18, pp. 6649–6655, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  61. A. Ohradanova, K. Gradin, M. Barathova et al., “Hypoxia upregulates expression of human endosialin gene via hypoxia-inducible factor 2,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 99, no. 8, pp. 1348–1356, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  62. R. G. Bagley, N. Honma, W. Weber et al., “Endosialin/TEM 1/CD248 is a pericyte marker of embryonic and tumor neovascularization,” Microvascular Research, vol. 76, no. 3, pp. 180–188, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  63. J. D. Tissot, H. Yamashita, K. Nakamura et al., “IgM are associated to Spα (CD5 antigen-like),” Electrophoresis, vol. 23, no. 7-8, pp. 1203–1206, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  64. D. W. Dawson, O. V. Volpert, P. Gillis et al., “Pigment epithelium-derived factor: a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis,” Science, vol. 285, no. 5425, pp. 245–248, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  65. T. Falk, S. Zhang, and S. J. Sherman, “Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor (PEDF) is neuroprotective in two in vitro models of Parkinson's disease,” Neuroscience Letters, vol. 458, no. 2, pp. 49–52, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  66. M. M. Bilak, A. M. Corse, S. R. Bilak, M. Lehar, J. Tombran-Tink, and R. W. Kuncl, “Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) protects motor neurons from chronic glutamate-mediated neurodegeneration,” Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, vol. 58, no. 7, pp. 719–728, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  67. M. A. DeCoster, E. Schabelman, J. Tombran-Tink, and N. G. Bazan, “Neuroprotection by pigment epithelial-derived factor against glutamate toxicity in developing primary hippocampal neurons,” Journal of Neuroscience Research, vol. 56, no. 6, pp. 604–610, 1999. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  68. T. Sanagi, T. Yabe, and H. Yamada, “Adenoviral gene delivery of pigment epithelium-derived factor protects striatal neurons from quinolinic acid-induced excitotoxicity,” Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 224–233, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  69. M. Elahy, S. Baindur-Hudson, and C. R. Dass, “The emerging role of PEDF in stem cell biology,” Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, vol. 2012, Article ID 239091, 6 pages, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  70. Y. Liu, X. Teng, X. Yang et al., “Shotgun proteomics and network analysis between plasma membrane and extracellular matrix proteins from rat olfactory ensheathing cells,” Cell Transplantation, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 133–146, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  71. H. Kupcova Skalnikova, “Proteomic techniques for characterisation of mesenchymal stem cell secretome,” Biochimie, vol. 95, no. 12, pp. 2196–2211, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus