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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1390284, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1390284
Research Article

Construction of a Dual-Fluorescence Reporter System to Monitor the Dynamic Progression of Pluripotent Cell Differentiation

1Biotherapeutics Translational Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon 305-806, Republic of Korea
2Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764, Republic of Korea
3Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, College of Animal Bioscience and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
4Animal Biotechnology Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Wanju 565-851, Republic of Korea

Received 17 August 2016; Revised 6 October 2016; Accepted 18 October 2016

Academic Editor: Gary E. Lyons

Copyright © 2016 Wu-Sheng Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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