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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 1908365, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1908365
Review Article

The Modulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Osteoclastogenesis

1Center of Excellence of Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Sheikh Zayed District, 6th of October City, Giza 12566, Egypt
2Medical Molecular Genetics Department, Human Genetics and Genome Research Division, National Research Centre, Cairo 12411, Egypt
3Stem Cells Research Group, Centre of Excellence for Advanced Sciences, National Research Centre, Cairo 12411, Egypt

Received 12 July 2015; Accepted 21 September 2015

Academic Editor: Joel C. Glover

Copyright © 2016 Wessam E. Sharaf-Eldin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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