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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 2349261, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2349261
Research Article

Utility of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generation

1South Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine, Brownsville, TX, USA
2Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, The Institute of Living, Hartford, CT, USA
3Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Received 14 January 2016; Revised 1 April 2016; Accepted 8 May 2016

Academic Editor: Andrzej Lange

Copyright © 2016 Satish Kumar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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