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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2759403, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2759403
Review Article

Vascular Transdifferentiation in the CNS: A Focus on Neural and Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells

1INSERM U1051, Institut des Neurosciences de Montpellier, Hôpital St Eloi, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34091 Montpellier Cedex 05, France
2Université Montpellier 2, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5, France
3CHU Montpellier, Hôpital Gui de Chauliac, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier, France

Received 25 March 2016; Accepted 5 September 2016

Academic Editor: Giorgio Stassi

Copyright © 2016 Sophie Guelfi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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