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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 3764681, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3764681
Review Article

Regenerative Therapy of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: From Pancreatic Islet Transplantation to Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Clinical Research Unit, Zentrum für Innere Medizin, Fachbereich Medizin, Justus Liebig Universität Giessen, 35392 Giessen, Germany

Received 1 October 2015; Accepted 14 December 2015

Academic Editor: Robert Deans

Copyright © 2016 Nadine E. Rekittke et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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