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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5178965, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5178965
Review Article

Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

Center for Molecular Biomedicine (CMB), Department of Biochemistry, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Hans-Knöll-Straße 2, 07745 Jena, Germany

Received 1 July 2015; Revised 3 September 2015; Accepted 9 September 2015

Academic Editor: Kevin D. Bunting

Copyright © 2016 Christian Kosan and Maren Godmann. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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