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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 5838934, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5838934
Review Article

Generation of Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Interneurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Relevant Tool for In Vitro Modeling of Neurological Disorders Pathology and Therapy

1Molecular Animal Biotechnology Laboratory, Szent Istvan University, Pater K. Street 1, Godollo 2100, Hungary
2BioTalentum Ltd., Aulich L. Street 26, Godollo 2100, Hungary
3Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Hospital Duran i Reynals, 3a Planta, Gran Via de l’Hospitalet 199, Hospitalet de Llobregat, 08908 Barcelona, Spain

Received 3 August 2016; Revised 3 November 2016; Accepted 9 November 2016

Academic Editor: Yang D. Teng

Copyright © 2016 Anna Ochalek et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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