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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 6235687, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6235687
Review Article

Increased Understanding of Stem Cell Behavior in Neurodegenerative and Neuromuscular Disorders by Use of Noninvasive Cell Imaging

1Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging and Pathology, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2Department of Development and Regeneration, Kulak Kortrijk, Department of Paediatric Neurology, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
3Translational Cardiomyology Lab, Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
4Stem Cell Institute Leuven, Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
5UZ Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Campus Gasthuisberg, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

Received 25 September 2015; Revised 7 January 2016; Accepted 11 January 2016

Academic Editor: Christian Dani

Copyright © 2016 Bryan Holvoet et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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