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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6809105, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6809105
Review Article

Glioblastoma Stem Cells Microenvironment: The Paracrine Roles of the Niche in Drug and Radioresistance

1Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L’Aquila, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
2Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA
3Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena, 53011 Siena, Italy
4National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Assergi, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy

Received 19 August 2015; Revised 9 November 2015; Accepted 10 November 2015

Academic Editor: Ilya V. Ulasov

Copyright © 2016 Alessia Fidoamore et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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