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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 7954580, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7954580
Review Article

Functional and Biological Role of Endothelial Precursor Cells in Tumour Progression: A New Potential Therapeutic Target in Haematological Malignancies

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Human Oncology, Section of Internal Medicine and Clinical Oncology, University of Bari Medical School, 70124 Bari, Italy

Received 15 March 2015; Revised 19 June 2015; Accepted 10 August 2015

Academic Editor: Pavla Jendelova

Copyright © 2016 Antonia Reale et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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