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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8342625, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8342625
Review Article

Renal Cancer Stem Cells: Characterization and Targeted Therapies

1Excellence Centre for Research, Transfer and High Education for the Development of DE NOVO Therapies (DENOTHE), 50139 Florence, Italy
2Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, 50139 Florence, Italy
3Nephrology Unit, Meyer Children’s University Hospital, 50141 Florence, Italy

Received 17 March 2016; Accepted 24 April 2016

Academic Editor: Ander Abarrategi

Copyright © 2016 Anna Julie Peired et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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