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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 8352684, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8352684
Review Article

The Role of miRNAs in the Regulation of Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells

1Division of Abdominal Surgical Oncology, Hepatobiliary Unit, National Cancer Institute “G. Pascale Foundation”, IRCCS, 80131 Naples, Italy
2Animal Facility Unit, National Cancer Institute “G. Pascale Foundation”, IRCCS, 80131 Naples, Italy
3Division of Radiology, National Cancer Institute “G. Pascale Foundation”, IRCCS, 80131 Naples, Italy

Received 18 November 2015; Revised 24 December 2015; Accepted 27 January 2016

Academic Editor: Hu Li

Copyright © 2016 Sabrina Bimonte et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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