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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9156731, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9156731
Research Article

Effects of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Human Trophoblast Cell Functions In Vitro

1Clinical and Translational Research Center, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200040, China
2Department of Obstetrics, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200040, China

Received 6 May 2015; Revised 23 August 2015; Accepted 8 October 2015

Academic Editor: William L. Stanford

Copyright © 2016 Yajing Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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