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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9240652, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9240652
Review Article

Stem Cell Imaging: Tools to Improve Cell Delivery and Viability

Department of Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0448, USA

Received 8 July 2015; Revised 6 October 2015; Accepted 15 October 2015

Academic Editor: Olivier Gheysens

Copyright © 2016 Junxin Wang and Jesse V. Jokerst. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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