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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9674614, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9674614
Research Article

The Effects of High Glucose on Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Gestational Tissue-Derived MSCs

1Medical Sciences Program (Cellular and Molecular Biology), Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
2Division of Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
3Center of Excellence in Stem Cell Research, Thammasat University, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand
4Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand

Received 23 June 2015; Revised 31 August 2015; Accepted 15 September 2015

Academic Editor: Laura Lasagni

Copyright © 2016 Weerawan Hankamolsiri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Most type 2 diabetic patients are obese who have increased number of visceral adipocytes. Those visceral adipocytes release several factors that enhance insulin resistance making diabetic treatment ineffective. It is known that significant percentages of visceral adipocytes are derived from mesenchymal stem cells and high glucose enhances adipogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). However, the effect of high glucose on adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow and gestational tissue-derived MSCs is still poorly characterized. This study aims to investigate the effects of high glucose on proliferation as well as adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs derived from bone marrow and several gestational tissues including chorion, placenta, and umbilical cord. We found that high glucose reduced proliferation but enhanced adipogenic differentiation of all MSCs examined. The expression levels of some adipogenic genes were also upregulated when MSCs were cultured in high glucose. Although high glucose transiently downregulated the expression levels of some osteogenic genes examined, its effect on the osteogenic differentiation levels of the MSCs is not clearly demonstrated. The knowledge gained from this study will increase our understanding about the effect of high glucose on adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and might lead to an improvement in the diabetic treatment in the future.