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Stem Cells International
Volume 2016, Article ID 9798374, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9798374
Review Article

Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency: Current Treatment Options and Emerging Therapies

1Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Ophthalmology, Visual Optics and Visual Rehabilitation, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, T building, T4-Ophthalmology, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Antwerp, Belgium
2Department of Ophthalmology, Antwerp University Hospital, Dienst Oogheelkunde, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium
3Research Foundation-Flanders, Egmontstraat 5, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
4Center for Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Antwerp University Hospital, CCRG-Oogheelkunde, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650 Edegem, Belgium

Received 19 June 2015; Accepted 18 August 2015

Academic Editor: Kequan Guo

Copyright © 2016 Michel Haagdorens et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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