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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 1960965, 18 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1960965
Research Article

Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Like Cells Derived From Human iPSCs via Neural Crest Development and Their Application for Osteochondral Repair

1Graduate School of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan
2Graduate School of Frontier Bio Science, Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan
3Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Life Science Frontiers, Kyota University, Kyoto, Japan
4Graduate School of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan
5McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
6Institute for Medical Science in Sports, Osaka Health Science University, Osaka, Japan
7Grobal Center for Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Norimasa Nakamura; pj.ca.usho@arumakan.asamiron

Received 20 December 2016; Accepted 3 April 2017; Published 18 May 2017

Academic Editor: Andrzej Lange

Copyright © 2017 Ryota Chijimatsu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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