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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3134543, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3134543
Research Article

Delivery of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improves Tear Production in a Mouse Model of Sjögren’s Syndrome

1Department of Comprehensive Care, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
2Department of Ophthalmology, USC Roski Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA
3University of Southern California School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, CA, USA
4Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
5Center for Translational Ocular Immunology, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Driss Zoukhri

Received 14 September 2016; Revised 2 December 2016; Accepted 21 December 2016; Published 2 March 2017

Academic Editor: Dominik Wolf

Copyright © 2017 Hema S. Aluri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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