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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 5846257, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5846257
Research Article

Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response

1Department of Biology, Chemistry and Environmental Studies, Molloy College, 1000 Hempstead Avenue, Rockville Centre, NY 11570, USA
2Biomedical Research Core, Winthrop University Hospital, 101 Mineola Blvd., Mineola, NY 11501, USA
3Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Jodi F. Evans; ude.yollom@snavej

Received 3 September 2016; Revised 22 November 2016; Accepted 18 December 2016; Published 16 January 2017

Academic Editor: Armand Keating

Copyright © 2017 Natalie Fernandez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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