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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 7012405, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7012405
Research Article

BMP4/LIF or RA/Forskolin Suppresses the Proliferation of Neural Stem Cells Derived from Adult Monkey Brain

1Shanghai Stomatological Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200001, China
2School of Medicine, Jiaxing University, Zhejiang 314001, China
3Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092, China
4Changzheng Hospital, Second Hospital Affiliated with Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003, China
5Tongji University Advanced Institute of Translational Medicine, Shanghai 200092, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xinxin Han; nc.ude.naduf@nahxx, Hua He; moc.anis@hh9791adnap, and Zhengliang Gao; nc.ude.ijgnot@oag_gnailgnehz

Received 19 May 2017; Revised 22 July 2017; Accepted 24 August 2017; Published 20 September 2017

Academic Editor: Yao Li

Copyright © 2017 Xinxin Han et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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