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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 8085637, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8085637
Research Article

In Vivo Tracking of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4-Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration by Optical Molecular Imaging

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Byeong-Cheol Ahn; rk.ca.unk@0002cba

Received 15 February 2017; Revised 4 May 2017; Accepted 11 May 2017; Published 27 June 2017

Academic Editor: Renke Li

Copyright © 2017 Senthilkumar Kalimuthu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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