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Stem Cells International
Volume 2017, Article ID 9898439, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9898439
Review Article

Electromagnetic Fields for the Regulation of Neural Stem Cells

Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yujie Chen; moc.liamxof@6886nehceijuy

Received 14 May 2017; Accepted 2 August 2017; Published 28 August 2017

Academic Editor: Hailiang Tang

Copyright © 2017 Mengchu Cui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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