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Stem Cells International
Volume 2018, Article ID 1615497, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1615497
Research Article

Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced DNA Damage and Repair through the Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

1Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, C.U. 04510, Mexico
2Department of Environment and Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Roma, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Mahara Valverde; xm.manu.sacidemoib@araham

Received 9 December 2017; Revised 19 June 2018; Accepted 26 July 2018; Published 10 October 2018

Academic Editor: Heinrich Sauer

Copyright © 2018 Mahara Valverde et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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