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Stem Cells International
Volume 2018, Article ID 3292704, 16 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3292704
Research Article

Metabolic Heterogeneity Evidenced by MRS among Patient-Derived Glioblastoma Multiforme Stem-Like Cells Accounts for Cell Clustering and Different Responses to Drugs

1National Centre for Innovative Technologies in Public Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, 00161 Rome, Italy
2Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN Sez. di Roma, 00185 Rome, Italy
3Department of Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, 00161 Rome, Italy
4National Center for Drug Research and Evaluation, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, 00161 Rome, Italy
5National Centre for Animal Experimentation and Welfare, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, 00161 Rome, Italy
6Institute of Neurosurgery, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 00168 Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Antonella Rosi; ti.ssi@isor

Received 10 August 2017; Accepted 5 December 2017; Published 18 February 2018

Academic Editor: Arazdordi Toumadje

Copyright © 2018 Sveva Grande et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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