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Stem Cells International
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 4835491, 18 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/4835491
Review Article

Adult Neural Stem Cells: Basic Research and Production Strategies for Neurorestorative Therapy

1Federal Research Clinical Center of the Federal Biomedical Agency of Russian Federation, 28 Orekhovy Blvd, Moscow 115682, Russia
2Department of Basic and Applied Neurobiology, V.P. Serbsky Federal Medical Research Center for Psychiatry and Narcology, Moscow, Russia
3Institute for Advanced Studies, Federal Biomedical Agency of Russian Federation, Moscow, Russia

Correspondence should be addressed to V. P. Baklaushev; moc.liamg@ffopres

Received 13 November 2017; Accepted 1 February 2018; Published 1 April 2018

Academic Editor: Hee-Woo Lee

Copyright © 2018 E. M. Samoilova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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