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Stem Cells International
Volume 2018, Article ID 6392986, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6392986
Review Article

Current Perspectives regarding Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Alzheimer’s Disease

1Department of Oral Anatomy, Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
2Department of Dental Hygiene, Daejeon Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Young-Seok Park; rk.ca.uns@7oyaoya

Received 19 November 2017; Accepted 15 January 2018; Published 1 March 2018

Academic Editor: Shimon Slavin

Copyright © 2018 Kyeong-Ah Kwak et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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