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Scientifica
Volume 2012, Article ID 424965, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.6064/2012/424965
Review Article

The Visual Effects of Intraocular Colored Filters

Behavioral and Brain Sciences Program, UGA Vision Laboratory, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA

Received 25 June 2012; Accepted 7 August 2012

Academic Editors: H. Noma and M. J. Seiler

Copyright © 2012 Billy R. Hammond Jr. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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