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Scientifica
Volume 2012, Article ID 703675, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.6064/2012/703675
Review Article

The Neuropathology of Autism

Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology, School of Medicine, Boston University, 72 East Concord Street L 1004, Boston, MA 02118, USA

Received 2 October 2012; Accepted 7 November 2012

Academic Editors: S. Dahiya, F. Keller, G. Marucci, T. L. Richards, and M. Wasniewska

Copyright © 2012 Gene J. Blatt. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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